How charities are using Storify

Last week I was invited to speak at CIPR’s Social Media Panel event on Social Storytelling. I was asked to speak specifically on Storify (if you know me, you know how much I LOVE Storify) and how charities are using it.

Here’s my presentation:

I was joined on the night by the fabulous Jessica Gioglio, Head of Creative Lab at Sprinklr and co-author of ‘The Power of Visual Storytelling’ who gave a wonderful presentation.

Will Barker presented on how Tenovus Cancer Care used Snapchat for traditional PR and the amazing results that they had.

For more presentations and a Storify of the event, click here.

Does your charity use Storify? Share your best ever Storify in the comments below.

Takeaways from the Institute of Fundraising’s Technology conference

Last week I was very lucky to attend the Institute of Fundraising’s Technology conference as a guest of The Access Group.

IoF Technology Conference

IoF Technology Conference

It was a jam packed conference with excellent sessions including a keynote from Dan Sutch from Nominet on What does social tech innovation look like?

If you know me at all, you will know that I love to Storify so here it is:
View the story “The Institute of Fundraising Technology Conference” on Storify

My Top Takeaways were:

1. Creativity and risk taking, entrepreneurship and willingness are what we need to redesign how we use technology for good. Cancer Research UK’s Cell Slider is a great example of this in action.

2. Anticipated value of mobile transaction in 2013 is $600 billion yet how many charity websites do you know who can’t take a mobile payment? The time to optimise your website for mobile is now!

3. The mobile environment is difficult, ever changing and crowded but charities can not afford to ignore it – 25% of Save the Children’s donations are made through mobile.

4. Google Adwords should be part of an integrated marketing campaign. It’s about quality, not quantity. Get the basics right – structure, relevance and targeting – as it will drive more relevant traffic to your website and drive the costs down.

5. Be Digital First, focus on visual storytelling and engagement and maximise the potential of technology.

How I will Improve my Online Engagement

I attended a CharityComms conference on Online Engagement yesterday with really interesting speakers, including Bertie Bosredon, Damien Austin-Walker, Jacqui O’Beirne and Maryam Mossavar amongst others.

Topics included ‘A Strategic Approach to Online Engagement’, ‘Content is King’, ‘Engaging Donors with Online Video’, ‘Acquisition and Innovation – Ways to Find and Convert New Supporters Online’ and many more.

Here is a brilliant video that Brad Smith, Assistant Digital Media Manager at the British Red Cross shared during his workshop on Using Metrics to Improve Website Engagement. It’s food for thought…

You can read the Storify of the conference in all its glory here.

Conferences are always quite full-on so it’s important to reflect on the discussions a day or two later and write down a list of things that really stood out and which will help you to be more effective in your role.

Here are five things I took away from the conference that I wish to implement:

1. Make a more concerted effort to really segment our email marketing audiences and create content that is useful and interesting to them

2. Be more customer centric and create content marketing to appeal to our social media audience

3. Look at improving our YouTube channel and add an action call to encourage more subscribers

4. Implement Ben Holts’s five steps to improve a digital campaign

5. Start measuring our social media more effectively and start using Google Analytics more

If you were at the conference, what did you take away from it? Let me know in the comments field.

Embarrassing meeting situations… we’ve all had them

I came back from a meeting yesterday where I had managed to knock over a jug of milk in a rather posh restaurant. It went all over the grey carpet and my handbag and was, of course, rather embarrassing.

So, naturally, when I got home I tweeted about it and the responses that followed from others are priceless.

My personal favourites include:

SmallCrazy

skipinder

Rochelle (2)

So how do you recover? Acknowledge the situation and take control of it. Perhaps it is through humour, apologising or following up with an explanation if you only realise after the meeting. We all make mistakes…it’s how we deal with them that matters.

Please take a look at the hashtag #SoDoIGetTheJob and share your embarrassing meeting moments- it’s really quite cathartic!

Take a look at the Storify to read other’s embarrassing moments and be warned…they WILL make you laugh out loud!