Canva for Nonprofits

I am delighted to announce that Canva has now got a dedicated Canva for Nonprofits webpage where you can apply for your free account.

Get your skates on!

I have extolled the virtues of this design tool in many a blog post and article since I first heard about it in 2015. I’m a big fan and use it myself. It’s a super-easy tool to use and brings social media posts to life.

Previously you had to email Canva to ask for free access to Canva for Work for your charity but I guess they have been inundated with requests that they have made the process far easier by allowing you to simply apply online.

For U.K charities you will need to prove your charitable status by supplying your Charity Registration Number from the Charity Commission or CIC Registration Number or Articles and Memorandum of Association along with your online application.

Canva for Nonprofits gives charities access to Canva for Work’s premium features for up to 10 people in your organisation – all for free. However, use of premium elements will still be charged on a per element basis. The great thing about Canva for Work is that you can upload your logo, set your fonts and colour palettes so that the posts you create are always on-brand.

If you need inspiration for your designs, they have a host of case studies such as Amnesty International Australia.

If you want to unlock the premium features, apply today for your free charity account.

Top content tools you need to know about

If you work in communications, social media or marketing then you need to know about these free tools to help you create eye-catching content.

Design

Canva is a free design tool that allows you to create amazing graphics for all your social media and marketing needs. They have a whole host of great features, such as uploading your own images, adding filters, making elements transparent, adding text over images and free illustrations and elements to help you create infographic-style designs. I use it lot for my personal travel and food blog but here’s a Facebook cover photo I created for the Third Sector PR & Comms Network Facebook group.

third sectorPR & CommsNetwork

 

What’s also great about Canva is that it has templates for Facebook cover images, Twitter images, Pinterest posts etc so no need for you to look up the exact dimensions. Best of all? Canva for work, which is a paid version with added features, is free for charities – just apply here.

Notegraphy makes your words look beautiful so that they stand out. Download the app on the App store or Google Play and get writing. Here’s a video to explain how it works:

Images

To create great graphics, you need high quality images. It’s always best to use your own but sometimes that’s not always possible. Here are my favourite go-to websites for high resolution images that allow you to use them as you like – crop, filter, add text etc and no need to credit the photographer: Unsplash, Gratisography, Pexels, Pixabay and Morguefile.

Infographics

If you have a lot of interesting data that you’d like to turn into an infographic, take a look at HubSpot’s free infographic templates. They are PowerPoint templates which you can edit. You can use your own colours and fonts to ensure it’s on brand.

Not free but Piktochart offer charities pricing at $39.99 for  year. They have 400 templates of Infographics that you can edit and customise. Also included are stock photos (if needed) and industry-specific icons.

Gifs

Gifs are moving images that can help add an element of fun into your social media posts. Twitter has a really handy gif feature built in, powered by Gify, where you can use keywords to search through thousands of gifs. CRUK’s Drylathlon Twitter account uses Twitter gifs a lot as it fits in with their cheeky tone of voice:

But what if you want to make you own? Make A Gif is a free tool that lets you make gifs from photos or even video. So why not get experimenting with gifs of an event or even your staff?

What tools do you use? Leave a comment below!

 

 

How charities are using gamification to research, to fundraise and to campaign

Gamification is about using game mechanics, such as rewarding behaviour through badges and creating competition through leader boards, to influence the player’s behaviour. It’s less about game play but rather about the psychology of people’s motivations to act in certain ways. Once we understand how people behave and what motivates them to act, we can create something meaningful to influence their behaviour in a way that is beneficial to us.

Here is a post I recently wrote for the Guardian Voluntary Sector on five gamification campaigns by Depaul, Save the Children, The Children’s Society and Cancer Research UK.

I’m currently working with social innovation company Loop Labs, who are developing a game to inspire adults to drive less and walk more, through the use of pester power, in order to create happier, healthier, safer and more sustainable cities to live in. We’re looking for kids aged 7-11 to give us feedback on designs for the game, Badgerscape.

Please spread the word, or if you can help then please tweet #meandmykidarein to @L00plabs

 

Great examples of charity copy

I’ve been pinning great examples of charity copy (in my opinion) on Pinterest for a while now. Please take a look and leave comments on the pins that capture your interest, make you think or tug on your heartstrings. Or perhaps there are some which you don’t agree with…let’s get talking!

Find my Great Examples of Charity Copy Pinterest board here.

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