Announcing the Charity Governance Award winners

Last night I attended the inaugural Charity Governance Awards at the Clothworkers Hall in London. The awards were organised by the Clothworkers’ Company in partnership with Reach, Prospectus and NPC (New Philanthropy Capital).

I’m delighted these awards exist as it’s important to recognise good governance. Usually the only time we hear about governance is when it’s bad and it all goes horribly wrong.

By shining a spotlight on the best of the sector, we want to demonstrate how effective governance can transform a charity and even more of the lives of its beneficiaries.

Charities were invited to apply for the awards and there was a two-stage judging process. The fourteen judges boast a wealth of experience in charity governance and the voluntary sector and included Dawn Austwick (Chief Executive, Big Lottery Fund), Tony Cohen (Chair of Barnardo’s) and Janet Thorne (CEO of Reach Volunteering).

The six winning charities will share in the £30,000 prize pot, each winning a £5,000 unrestricted grant.

The winning charities represent a diverse range of subject areas including youth work, heritage conservation, mental health support, palliative care, and community improvement. I was really impressed with what the boards of these charities had achieved and all the charities shortlisted were worthy winners but of course, there can only be one…

Winners:

Board diversity and inclusivity

Leap Confronting Conflict, winners at Charity Governance Awards (photo by Kate Darkins).jpg

Improving impact – charities with 0-3 staff

Robert Thompson Charities, winners at Charity Governance Awards (photo by Kate Darkins).jpg

Improving impact – charities with 4-25 staff

Improving impact – charities with 26+ staff

St Cuthberts Hospice, winners at Charity Governance Awards (photo by Kate Darkins).jpg

Embracing opportunity and harnessing risk

Managing turnaround

Moasic Clubhouse, winners at Charity Governance Awards (photo by Kate Darkins).jpg

The 2017 Awards will open for entry on 6 October so make sure you put your Board forward.

Congratulations to all the winners and to all the Boards shortlisted!

 

How crowdfunding is changing the face of social action

I am very proud to be on the panel of this year’s #FRO16 by The Resource Alliance, which is a global two-day online conference aimed at helping charities and social enterprises have access to case studies, new thinking and best practice – for free.

If you register now for #FRO16, you’ll be able to watch all the sessions for one month. Sessions include speakers from JustGiving, Storythings, Indiegogo, SolarAid, Platypus Digital, Dignity in Dying, HOME fundraising, Change.org and many more.

In association with The Resource Alliance, I’ve produced a whitepaper which looks at how crowdfunding is changing the face of social action. Download if for free, here. Follow the hashtag, #FRo16, to see what people are saying!

An apology, a declutter and some useful links

I have been neglecting this blog and I’m sorry. However, I have very good reason… as you may know I have been freelance again since October last year and boy have I been busy. It’s been great though – I’m working on some really interesting projects with charities, businesses and start-ups and I’ve also become a regular writer for Third Sector’s Digital Hub.

I’ve also recently moved house and I was really impressed with how easy it’s been to change my contact details for the charities I support with monthly direct debits. I thought it was going to be tricky to find out how to let them know but all of them had pretty easy to find details on their websites and I received a reply within two working days. Much more efficient and far less time consuming than informing my banks, I can tell you! What was really nice was the personalised emails I received back. I particularly like this one because yes, moving is stressful!

CRUK

On the subject of moving house, I suddenly found myself with so much stuff. Stuff I didn’t need so I packed up eleven boxes (yes, eleven boxes AFTER moving house) and emailed the British Heart Foundation to collect them. It was relatively fuss-free and I had them collected on the Monday Bank Holiday (no holiday for them, clearly).

A few things that have caught my attention in the past months that you may find interesting:

My charity boss’s bullying still haunts me –  Guardian Voluntary Sector Network, Confessions of a charity professional. Disturbing and distressing but a must-read. The comments really opened my eyes and so did the discussion that took place when I posted this on the Third Sector PR & Communications Network group that I manage on Facebook.

How to illustrate difficult causes and subjects – Madeleine Sugden. Madeleine’s posts are always well thought out and well researched. Take a look at her past posts too. Or better yet, subscribe.

It’s time for charities to stop wasting money on social media – Matt Collins for the Guardian Voluntary Sector Network. Oh boy did this kick off. Poor Matt had to contend with loads of tweets and comments that were really rather unpleasant. I get what Matt was trying to say and that is that social is just one part of your toolbox. There are other tools that are actually more effective (like email) so make sure you’re using all of them to their full potential and not just putting all your eggs into your social media basket.

Charity Boards are failing to adapt to the digital age -this has to change – Zoe Amar for the Guardian Voluntary Sector Network. Always insightful, Zoe makes the case that boards who ignore or don’t understand digital, do so at their peril.

Does your organisation represent more than just clutter in the eyes of your donors? – Seth Piper for The Resource Alliance. I absolutely love this post and I’m pretty certain it’s what spurred me on to do my own declutter.

I promise I will try to post more regularly. In the meantime, if you’d like to connect with me I’m over on Twitter at LondonKirsty.